Types of Sales Persons In Real Estate

Without sales skills, no business would survive. Strong sales skills include building trust authentically. Building trust with your clients is a requirement in real estate, because it’s a priority for people who are learning how to find a good real estate agent.

Learning about the types of sales persons in real estate uncovers your strengths. If you’re a new agent, this helps you identify your innate skills, so you know how to market yourself as a realtor. If you’re a brokerage or company leader, you can create more effective training materials and guide your team to success. 

Every individual has their own style of course, but there are four basic types of sales persons in real estate. Keep reading to discover what they are as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each type. 

The Relationship Guru

A relationship guru is your classic “people person.” Relationship selling articles are written based off of them, because they’re naturals at relationship selling. They are the people who find joy in conversations, meeting new people, and serving core client needs. 

Relationship gurus love to get to know people on their terms. These professionals are happy to do a dinner meeting, lunch call, coffee meetup, or whatever their clients prefer.

They are of the mind that business will go well if their client is comfortable. To this end, they’re happy to adjust their own plans (within reason) if they’ll land an appointment or opportunity for doing so. 

Many relationship gurus can be described as gregarious, outgoing, hospitable, and even lively. They are motivated by connecting with individuals and serving needs rather than the size of their commission. 

Strengths

The strengths of relationship gurus include their hospitality, warmth, and flexibility. They barely need to brush up on relationship selling techniques or the ABCs of relationship selling, because it’s an innate ability for them. Relationship gurus strive to be the person anyone can feel comfortable sharing their questions with, and they build genuine connections because of it.

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Weaknesses

Relationship gurus’ weaknesses can lie in not targeting the right kinds of buyers. Early on in sales careers, it can be hard to spot tire kickers. These are the types of people who ask questions and show interest, but don’t have any serious intent to buy. Because relationship-driven people are happy to connect with almost anyone, they may miss these characteristics and end up wasting time. 

What to Focus On

Relationship gurus should focus on setting a reasonable amount of appointments each week to start. Though they love to connect with people, overextending oneself leads to exhaustion and poor performance.

They should also be upfront with all of their prospects, as this sets conversations up for success. Being honest from day one about what one can and can’t do fosters respect in all of one’s business relationships. 

The Pumped Up Closer

The pumped up closer is one of the types of sales persons who loves the challenge of prospecting and closing deals. They’re typically high energy, somewhat (or very) aggressive, extroverted, and smooth with words. 

There’s no such thing as too many leads for the pumped up closer because they want as many conversations as possible. Learning why a smaller number of strong leads is good for business usually isn’t on their mind.

This type of salesperson is not deterred by prospects’ reluctance or unfamiliarity with their work. Pumped up closers are gratified by sealing another deal and becoming the best at what they do. 

Strengths

The strengths of this type are their extroverted nature, resilience, and familiarity with all kinds of questions. They stay informed on the housing market forecast and the best time to sell a house.

Though anyone can learn to be thick-skinned, pumped up closers seem to be born with this trait. Such professionals are drawn to sales roles at a young age and build knowledge on the go. This gives them experience that can’t be taught in a classroom and they become higher value the further their career takes them. 

Weaknesses

For all their energy, pumped up closers have soft spots too. One of their weaknesses is focusing too much on the deal and not enough on the person. No matter who it is, prospects want to know an agent has their best interests at heart. If pumped up closers aren’t careful, they can alienate leads before they ever get a chance to speak with them. 

What to Focus On

Pumped up closers do well to remember that everyone is human at the end of the day. Rather than viewing sales conversations as targets, see them as opportunities to understand people. The best sales professionals don’t have to push for the deal; they listen first and identify actions later. 

The Friendly Helper

The friendly helper is exactly as they sound–someone who loves helping people. They thrive by bridging people to solutions and vice versa. Friendly helpers are delighted to provide answers and support for their clients and seek out opportunities to do so. 

One can expect friendly helpers to be remarkably warm and personable–and they are. Traits that are often overlooked, however, are their quick-wittedness and resourcefulness.

Because of the sheer number of people they’ve helped over the years, they often have an answer for every inquiry. Chances are they already know the fastest way to get more referrals, as it comes naturally to them.

If a friendly helper doesn’t have an answer, they know where and how to find one. These characteristics make them fun and enjoyable to be around.

Strengths

Friendly helpers’ strengths are their powerful combination of personability and relevant input. They’re the kind that make buying or selling a home simpler because of how it feels.

Rather than being a drawn out process of paperwork and legal requirements, it becomes a fun series of tasks that can be completed in short bursts. Those tasks include learning how to get a home appraisal and getting a comparative market analysis.

Weaknesses

One weakness of these types of sales persons is that they may have unrealized potential. Some professionals of this kind are generalists by nature, and they simply love pitching in where they can.

Other friendly helpers have become so because they’re reluctant to share their real gifts with the world. This can cause someone to effectively flounder at a low level, when what they’d much rather do is generate unique results. 

What to Focus On

Friendly helpers should focus on developing their strengths. While it’s incredibly useful to be helpful to all kinds of people, this often means you can’t provide specialized help when it’s needed most. 

Friendly helpers are likely to feel revitalized as they lean into what they do best. By identifying the types of clients they’ve served most often, they can uncover previously missed or misunderstood strengths. This brings out the best of their experience and gives them natural means to connect with new people.

The Proactive Consultant

Proactive consultants are one of the most complex types of sales persons and also the most misunderstood. While most people can wrap their minds around the idea of an outgoing or super friendly salesperson, fewer people understand where a different personality fits in. 

The proactive consultant is a keen individual that seeks customized solutions for clients. They understand that no client is the same, and accordingly, no response should be one-size-fits-all. This type of salesperson tends to read often, sharing their findings in conversations with colleagues and friends. 

Strengths

A proactive consultant strives to make the most of every interaction. They treat every client as their last and aren’t satisfied offering mediocre service.

This type of real estate agent may take notes at every appointment, keeping detailed records of clients’ needs. Because of their attention to detail, they tend to be the best at holding an open house for clients.

This level of care and attention gives them a clear advantage over reluctant and inexperienced agents. Clients who feel valued and seen are more likely to open up, making it easier to close deals. Proactive consultants balance their professional insights with individualized attention–a powerhouse combination. 

Weaknesses

Proactive consultants are remarkable at noticing the details, but sometimes they spend too long on them. Despite their genuine efforts to find just the right home, consultants may forget that they aren’t the ones in the driver’s seat.

Clients are the ones who decide yes or no, and it’s to the agent’s benefit to remember this. Rather than trying to find a perfect answer all the time, simply listen well and let the client speak on the rest. If a customer doesn’t like a property, they will let you know. 

Proactive consultants may also forget they can’t read minds. Even though they bring years of experience to the table, insight never replaces the human touch. Being friendly and open-minded is the perfect complement to the consultant’s robust analytical skills.

What to Focus On

While other types need to lean in and pay attention to the details, proactive consultants benefit from the opposite. Since this type is already focused on the nitty gritty, stepping back to review existing listings for a good fit is beneficial. 

The proactive consultant wants to offer something unique to every client, but is relieved when they discover they don’t need to. Not every home buyer is looking for an exceptional home; many simply want one that meets their needs. By placing less pressure on themselves to be perfectionists, they can still drive business without as much stress. 

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